About Us

The Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown was created in 1949 by resolution of the Mayor and Council due to the need of low-rent housing for low-income families. A contract between the Authority and the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development allows the Authority to rent to lower income families.

The Housing Authority is a nonprofit organization operating under the laws of the State of Maryland to provide housing for low-income families within the City of Hagerstown.  In 2004, the Housing Authority formed the Hagerstown Revitalization Corporation as a nonprofit corporation to augment, benefit, and enhance the functions of, or carry out the purpose of the Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown by
• Providing social, educational, and recreational services to the residents of the housing developments of the Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown;
• Revitalizing neighborhoods surrounding the housing developments of the Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown, including by developing, redeveloping, owning, managing, maintaining, improving, repairing, or investing in housing and community facilities primarily serving low income families;
• Providing funds in the form of loans or grants for the purchase, acquisition, improvement, lease, operation and renovation of housing for low-income families to enhance and improve the quality and quantity of the housing stock within the territorial jurisdiction of the Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown;
• Performing services in the fields of housing management, housing maintenance and housing administration relating to housing and community facilities primarily serving low-income families within the territorial jurisdiction of the Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown;
• Making distributions to organizations that qualify as exempt organizations under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code;
• Undertaking other activities primarily serving the interests of the residents of the housing development of the Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown and other low-income residents within the territorial jurisdiction of the Housing Authority of the City of Hagerstown.

The Housing Authority an award winning agency that has been providing housing for the residents of Hagerstown for over 65 years.   We have been recently honored with awards from industry leaders such as National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials (NAHRO) and Nan McKay Associates.  HHA has also consistently been identified as a High Performer under HUD’s rating system for housing authorities.

The Housing Authority now manages 1,320 dwelling units in 11 communities and also subsidizes the rental of approximately 943 dwelling units in the private market under the Section 8 Housing Voucher Program including 59 units under Veterans Affair Supportive Housing (VASH) voucher program. The Authority also built, through national competition programs, additional communities that it manages and plans to own when tax credit requirements expire. The Authority currently provides housing assistance for approximately 12% of the population of the City of Hagerstown.

HHA is very proud of the services available to our residents. Through our Resident Services Department, and with the cooperation and participation of many local agencies and partners, the Housing Authority is able to offer a variety of events and programs to residents of our communities.

Our Resident Services staff also works with residents on things like budgeting, tax preparation information, Medicare questions, agency referrals and much, much more.

HHA also provides an in-house Security Department with regular patrols throughout all our communities.  Our Security Department works closely and in cooperation with the local police departments to ensure the safety of our residents.

Our Properties Department employs mechanics with a wide variety of skills and talents.  This, along with proper planning, enables HHA to maintain its communities to the highest standards.

The Hagerstown Housing Authority is an Equal Opportunity Housing Facility and does not discriminate on the basis of color, creed, religion, sex or handicap.

Overview

 

To find out more about our team, goals, and mission, watch the video below, or scroll down to select a topic.

The Board of Commisioners

General information about the Board 

Mission Statement

View our mission statement here

Executive Team

Contact information for our executive team 

HUD Assessments

HUD PHA Performance Indicators.

Our Location

View our map etc.

Fair Housing

Learn more about Fair Housing

Agency Plan

General information about our agency plan.

The Board

Five local citizens, appointed by the Mayor, serve without pay as Commissioners to create policy and guidance to the professional staff that is led by the Executive Director.  The Executive Director reports directly to the board. Each Commissioner serves a five-year term, one term expiring each year.

Regular Board meetings begin at 12:30 pm on the second Thursday of each month at the Administration Office of the Authority . The Chair may cancel or postpone a regular meeting in any month during which there is no business to transact.

The present Commissioners are:

Carolyn W. Brooks, Chairman
Richard McCleary, Vice Chairman
Gene Bowers, Resident Representative
George Hill, Board Member
Rosalind Martin, Board Member

Sean Griffith, Executive Director

Mission Statement

The Hagerstown Housing Authority is committed to providing quality, affordable housing in a safe environment. Through partnerships with our residents and other groups, we will provide opportunities for those we serve to become self-sufficient.

Executive Team

click a tab to view the contact information for our executive team members

Sean Griffith
sgriffith@hagerstownha.com
301-733-6911 ext. 126

Lorrie Young
lyoung@hagerstownha.com
301-733-6911 ext. 129

Dianne Rudisill
drudisill@hagerstownha.com
301-733-6911 ext. 125

David Kump
dkump@hagerstownha.com
301-733-6911 ext. 141

Christopher Howlett
chowlett@hagerstownha.com
301-733-6911 ext. 160

Rhonda Will
rwill@hagerstownha.com
301-733-6911 ext. 140

George Stull
gstull@hagerstownha.com
301-733-6911 ext. 138

Our Location

The Hagerstown Housing Authority office is located at 35 W. Baltimore Street in Hagerstown, MD.

Agency Plan

The Public Housing Agency Plan is a plan that informs HUD, residents, and the public of our mission for serving the needs of low-income and very low-income families and our strategy for addressing those needs.  Our Annual Agency Plan covers the policies, rules, and requirements concerning our operations, programs, and services.

HUD INDICATORS

Since 1998 the Hagerstown Housing Authority has been designated by HUD as a High Performer in both the Public Housing Assessment System and the Section Eight Management Assessment Program. To learn more about these indicators, please read below.

About PHAS

 

The Public Housing Assessment System, or PHAS, is the system that HUD uses to assess a PHA’s performance in managing its low-rent public housing programs. HUD uses a centralized system to collect individual subsystem scores using various sub indicators and produces a composite PHAS score representing PHA’s performance management.

PHAS uses a 100-point scoring system based on four categories of indicators:

• PASS (Physical Assessment Subsystem) – 40 points
• FASS (Financial Assessment Subsystem) – 25 points
• MASS (Management Assessment Subsystem) – 25 points
• CFP (Capital Fund Program) – 10 points

Scores are generated for each development, or Asset Management Project (AMP). AMP scores are weighted by how many units are in the AMP and then combined into the agency-wide score. The total score is used to determine the PHA’s designation under PHAS. Scores below 60 result in a troubled designation. Scores of 90 points or above result in a high performer designation. Scores below 90 but above 60 are designated as a standard performer. If a PHA scores below 60 in any one indicator, it will be designated as a substandard performer.

PASS (Physical Assessment Subsystem) – 40 points
What is its Purpose? The purpose of the PASS is to determine whether public housing units are decent, safe, sanitary and in good repair, and to determine the level to which the PHA is maintaining its public housing in accordance with housing condition standards.
How is it Scored?
The PASS score is determined by an inspection conducted in accordance with HUD’s Uniform Physical Condition Standards (UPCS). An independent physical inspection performed and scored for each project/AMP. A statistically valid sample of the units within the AMP is selected, and project scores roll up to a composite PHA score.

MASS (Management Assessment Subsystem) – 25 points
What is its Purpose?
The purpose of the management operations indicator is to assess the AMP’s and PHA’s management operations capabilities.
How is it Scored?
MASS is determined by data reported to HUD by the PHA in the Financial Data Schedule (FDS). A score is calculated for each AMP. Scores roll up to a composite PHA score. The FDS is a required report that is sent by the PHA to HUD/REAC both 60 days after the end of the fiscal year for unaudited financial data and nine months after the end of the fiscal year with the audited data. The MASS scores can be generated from either submission, but if there is a discrepancy in data, the Audited submission data will be used. Scores are assigned by the following sub-indicators:
• Occupancy: Emphasizes and measures the AMP’s performance in keeping available units occupied. The higher the occupancy rate, the higher the score. The maximum points assigned for this sub-indicator is 16 points.
• Resident Accounts Receivable: Measures the amount of resident accounts receivable against resident revenue (i.e. rent paid). The maximum points assigned for this sub-indicator is 5 points.
• Accounts Payable: Measures total vendor accounts payable, both current and past due against total monthly operating expenses. The lower the ratio, the higher the score. The maximum points assigned for this sub-indicator is 4 points.

FASS (Financial Assessment Subsystem) – 25 points
What is its Purpose?
The purpose of the financial condition indicator is to measure the financial condition of each public housing project.
How is it Scored?
FASS is determined by data reported to HUD by the PHA in the Financial Data Schedule (FDS). Project financial performance is scored for each project (AMP). The AMP scores will be averaged across the PHA, weighted according to unit count, and rolled up to a composite PHA score. The FDS is a required reporting that is sent by the PHA to HUD/REAC 60 days after the end of the Fiscal Year for the Unaudited Financial Data and 9 months after the end of the Fiscal Year with the Audited data. The FASS scores can be generated from either submission, but if there is a discrepancy in data the Audited submission data will be used. Late Penalty points and Late Presumptive Failure (LPF) for these submissions do apply to FASS Indicator score.

CFP (Capital Fund Program) – 10 points
What is its Purpose?
The purpose of the Capital Fund program assessment is to examine the period of time it takes a PHA to obligate the funds provided to it from the Capital Fund program. Ultimately, the purpose is for PHAs to obligate 90% or more of these funds as quickly as possible, and no later than 2 years after funds become available. It is also to modernize and develop units and improve overall occupancy and to meet HUD’s Strategic Plan goal to “Meet the Need for Quality Affordable Rental Homes.”
How is it Scored?
Uses information reported in eLOCCS for scoring.
Scores are assigned by the following sub-indicators:
• Fund Obligation – 5 points are assigned if the PHA obligated 90% of more of the CFP by the obligation end date with no sanctions.
• Occupancy Rate – Measures occupancy rate at fiscal year end after adjusting for HUD approved vacancies. A total of 5 points are assigned for a rate of 96% or greater. A total of 2 points are assigned for a rate of 93% but less than 96%. Zero points are assigned if the rate is less than 93%. If the PHA scored less than 5 points for Timeliness of Fund Obligation, the Occupancy Rate score is automatically zero. The other PHAS indicators require 60% or above to pass. The Capital fund indicator pass rate is 50%, or at least 5 points.

About SEMAP

The Section Eight Management Assessment Program (SEMAP) is HUD’s performance measurement tool for the Housing Choice Voucher Program. A PHA self-certifies to HUD 60 days after the end of the fiscal year. The Field Office will then issue a score within 120 days after the end of fiscal the year. High performers have a score above 90. Troubled performers have a score below 60.

SEMAP Indicators
All SEMAP performance indicators set a standard for a key area of Housing Choice Voucher Program management. PHAs are assessed against these standards to show whether the PHA administers the program properly and effectively. The SEMAP certification that is submitted by PHAs
addresses all of the following indicators:

Indicator 1 – Selection from Waiting List
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA has a written policy in its administrative plan for selecting applicants from the waiting list and whether it follows that policy. The certification must be based on the results of a quality control sample measuring the rate at which the PHA follows its selection policy.
Score: The PHA receives a score of 15 for this indicator if it certifies that it has a written policy and the sample shows that 98% of applicants selected from the waiting list were selected in a manner that conformed to the PHA’s policy. If the PHA had no policy or less than 98% of selected applicants were selected in the manner the policy prescribes, the PHA receives zero points for this indicator.

Indicator 2 – Rent Reasonableness
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA has a written policy for determining and documenting that the rent paid to owners is reasonable based on current rents for comparable unassisted units and whether it follows that policy. The PHA must conduct a quality control sample to determine whether the PHA is following its own policies for determining rent
reasonableness.
Score: The PHA receives 20 points for this indicator if the PHA has a written policy that meets HUD’s requirements and the sample shows that the policy was followed at least 98% of the time. The PHA receives 15 points for this indicator if the sample shows that the PHA’s policy was followed at least 80% of the time. If the PHA had no policy that met HUD’s requirements or if the PHA’s policy was followed less than 80% of the time, the PHA receives zero points for this indicator.

Indicator 3 – Determination of Adjusted Income
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA verifies and correctly determines adjusted annual income and utility allowances at each family’s admission and annual reexamination. The PHA must conduct a quality control sample to determine whether the PHA:

1) Obtains and uses third party verification of the factors that affect the determination of adjusted income or documents the reasons third party verification was not available,

2) Properly attributes and calculates medical, child care, and disability allowances; and

3) Uses the appropriate utility allowances.
Score: The PHA receives 20 points for this indicator if it certifies that it has verified and correctly determined adjusted annual income and utility allowances for at least 90% of families sampled. The PHA receives 15 points if the PHA correctly processed 80% to 89% of families sampled and zero points if less than 80% were correctly processed.

Indicator 4 – Utility Allowance Schedule
For this indicator, the PHA is scored on whether the PHA maintains an up-to-date utility allowance schedule. A utility allowance schedule is “up-to-date” if the PHA reviewed utility rate data within the last 12 months and adjusted its utility allowance schedule if there has been a change of 10% or more in a utility rate since the last time the utility allowance schedule was revised.
Score: If the PHA certifies that it has updated its utility allowance schedule, it receives 5 points for this indicator. If the PHA has not done so, it receives zero points for this indicator.

Indicator 5 – HQS Quality Control Inspections
This indicator measures whether the PHA has verified or re-inspected a sample of recently completed Housing Quality Standards (HQS) inspections representing a cross section of neighborhoods and a cross section of inspectors.
Score: A PHA receives 5 points for this indicator if it certifies that it has re-inspected a sample and zero points if it has not.

Indicator 6 – HQS Enforcement
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA addressed deficiencies found during HQS inspections in a manner that conforms to HUD regulations. To correctly address deficiencies, the PHA must ensure that:

1) Any cited life-threatening HQS deficiencies are corrected within 24
hours from the inspection,

2) All other cited HQS deficiencies are corrected within no more than
30 calendar days from the inspection or any PHA-approved extension,

3) If HQS deficiencies are not corrected timely, the PHA stops (abates) housing assistance payments beginning no later than the first of the month following the specified correction period or terminates the HAP contract,
and

4) For family-caused defects, the PHA takes prompt and vigorous action to enforce the family obligations. The PHA must conduct a quality control sample to determine whether the PHA has addressed deficiencies correctly.
Score: The PHA receives 10 points for this indicator if it certifies that the sample shows that all cited life-threatening HQS deficiencies were corrected within 24 hours and 98% of other HQS deficiencies were correctly addressed. Otherwise, the PHA receives zero points.

Indicator 7 – Expanding Housing Opportunities
PHAs with jurisdiction in a metropolitan fair market rent (FMR) area will be scored under this indicator. The score is based on whether the PHA has adopted and implemented a written policy to encourage participation by owners of units located outside areas of poverty or minority concentration,
as well as whether the PHA has researched and distributed information about areas of poverty or minority concentration to voucher holders.
Score: A PHA receives 5 points if it meets the following conditions. If the PHA does not meet these conditions, the PHA receives zero points.

1. The PHA has a written policy to encourage participation by owners of units located outside defined areas of poverty or minority concentration;
2. The PHA has followed its written policy;
3. The PHA has prepared maps of and information about areas that do not contain poverty or minority concentration, which the PHA uses when briefing rental voucher holders about the full range of areas where they may look for housing;
4. The PHA’s information packet contains information about portability;
5. The PHA has analyzed whether rental voucher holders have experienced difficulties in finding housing outside areas of poverty or minority concentration and, if such difficulties have been found, the PHA has considered seeking approval of exception payment standard amounts and has sought such approval when necessary.

Indicator 8 – Payment Standards
For this indicator, the PHA is scored on whether its payment standards do not exceed 110% and are not less than 90% of the current applicable published FMRs (unless a higher or lower payment standard amount is approved by HUD). The PHA submits the FMRs and payment standards in the SEMAP certification form.
Score: The PHA receives 5 points if the payment standards are between 90 and 110% of the FMRs, and zero points if they are not.

Indicator 9 – Annual Reexaminations
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA completes a reexamination for each participating family at least every 12 months.
Score: The PHA receives a score of 10 for this indicator if it certifies that it has completed a timely reexamination for over 95% of families, 5 points if it has completed a timely reexamination for between 90% and 95% of families, and zero points if it has completed a timely reexamination for less than 90% of families.

Indicator 10 – Correct Tenant Rent Calculations
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA correctly calculates tenant rent in the rental certificate program and the family’s share of the rent to owner in the rental voucher program.

Score: The PHA receives 5 points if it certifies that 2% or fewer of PHA tenant rent and family’s share of the rent to owner calculations are incorrect. The PHA receives zero points if more than 2% of these calculations are incorrect.

Indicator 11 – Pre-Contract HQS Inspections
The score for this indicator is based on the %age of newly leased units that pass HQS inspections.

Score: The PHA receives a score of 5 if it certifies that at least 98% of the newly leased units pass HQS inspections and zero points if less than 98% pass HQS inspections.

Indicator 12 – Annual HQS Inspections
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA inspects each unit under contract at least annually.
Score: The PHA receives a score of 10 for this indicator if it certifies that it has completed a timely inspection of over 95% of units, 5 points if it has completed a timely inspection of between 90% and 95% of units, and zero points if it has completed a timely inspection of less than 90% of units.

Indicator 13 – Lease-Up
The score for this indicator is based on whether the PHA has entered HAP contracts for the number of units reserved under Annual Contributions Contract (ACC) for at least one year. Data is entered into SEMAP by the field office. The lease-up indicator is measured by the greater of the unit or budget authority percentages.
Score: The PHA receives 20 points for this indicator if the percent of units leased or the percent of allocated budget authority expended during the last PHA fiscal year was 98% or more. The PHA receives 15 points if the relevant percentage is 95-97% and zero points if the percentage is less than 95%.

Indicator 14 – Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Enrollment
PHAs with mandatory FSS programs receive a score for this indicator based on whether the PHA has enrolled families in the FSS program as required and the percent of current FSS participants that have had increases in earned income that resulted in escrow account balances. The PHA provides this information as part of the SEMAP certification and the field office verifies it. If the certified mandatory minimum number of FSS units is different from the number listed in HUD records by a reasonable amount, this indicator will be scored based on the smaller number. If there is a large discrepancy between the two numbers, the field office must research the difference to determine
the correct number to enter.
Score: The PHA can earn up to 10 points for this indicator.

Deconcentration Bonus Indicator
PHAs that use a payment standard that exceeds 100% of the published FMR set at the 50th percentile rent in accordance with 24 CFR 888.113(c) must submit data for this indicator, while all other PHAs have the option of submitting deconcentration data.
Score: The PHA can earn 5 points for demonstrating that a high percent of its HCV families with children live in, or have moved during the PHA fiscal year to, low poverty census tracts in the PHA’s principal operating area. PHAs will not be adversely affected if they get zero points on this indicator.

Fair Housing
The mission of the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO) is to eliminate housing discrimination, promote economic opportunity, and achieve diverse, inclusive communities by leading the nation in the enforcement, administration, development, and public understanding of federal fair housing policies and laws.

Housing discrimination is illegal. If you believe you have experienced discrimination in renting or buying a home, getting a mortgage, obtaining housing insurance, seeking housing assistance, or in other housing-related activities, you can file a complaint with HUD. You can also file a complaint if you believe you have been denied an equal opportunity to participate in a HUD program.

Watch the Video below to learn more about Fair Housing

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